Pickering Real Estate

Pickering is located within the Regional Municipality of Durham and is considered to be a part of the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). Pickering is located approximately 35 kilometres east of Toronto, along the shores of Lake Ontario. It is bordered by the Scarborough (within the City of Toronto) the west and the Town of Ajax to the east.

The population of Pickering is approximately 105,000. A new community known as Seaton, which will be located north of Taunton Road, will eventually result in about 80,000 new inhabitants. The Seaton community should begin the first phase of construction 2010. Pickering has been designated by the Province of Ontario as an emerging growth centre in its Places to Grow Act and is expected to lead the nation in business and residential growth over the next 10 to 20 years. According to the Region of Durham, the population of Pickering is expected to reach 225,000 in 2031 and should become the most populous municipality in Durham Region.

The City has a strong and diversified business community with more than 3,000 businesses and a labour force of about 50,000. There are many large employers in Pickering including the Ontario Power Generation and Harmony Logistics. Pickering is well known for the OPG nuclear power plant, and the adjacent OPG 7 wind turbine, which supplies a significant amount of electricity to Ontario and employs over 6,000 people and thousands of related jobs.

Highway 401, Canada's busiest expressway travels through the middle of Pickering and provides easy access to Toronto. Pickering is the eastward termination point of Highway 407, Ontario’s only toll expressway. Plans to start the expansion of the highway eastward should be announced this year. Pickering is also serviced by GO trains and Durham Region Transit buses.

The City of Pickering consists of several communities and rural hamlets. The communities of Southern Pickering are:  Amberlea, Bay Ridges, Duffin Heights, Dunbarton, Liverpool, Lynn Heights, Maple Ridge, Rougemount, Rosebank, West Shore; and many others. The rural hamlet communities of Northern Pickering include: Greenwood, Brougham, Cherrywood, Claremont, Green River, Kinsale and Whitevale

History

While the date of the first habitation of the area formerly called Pickering Township is unknown, discoveries of artifacts around the mouth of Duffins Creek indicate human existence there at least four thousand years ago. By 1849 half of the Township had been cleared and was under cultivation.  In that year, Pickering Township achieved the political status it held until 1974.  At that time, Ontario County became the Regional Municipality of Durham and the Township of Pickering, with all its villages and hamlets, became the Town of Pickering. Ironically, the small community that was known by the name Pickering Village became a part of Ajax under regional government.

In 1972 the federal government made a controversial decision to expropriate approximately 7,350 hectares of land, encompassing the municipalities of Pickering, Markham and Uxbridge. The intent was to retain the lands for a potential international airport site to service the growth of Metropolitan Toronto. To date, little progress has been made on the creation of an airport, when and if it will ever be built is speculative.

Living in Pickering

The Pickering Recreation Complex is the main athletic facility in the city. The building is over 250,000 sq/ft and contains fitness equipment, conference rooms, a swimming pool, squash courts, indoor tennis courts and two rinks. There are two other arenas in Pickering: Don Beer Arena and Art Thompson Arena. The main outdoor athletic complex is Kinsmen Park, which contains baseball diamonds, soccer fields, and a football field. There are 8 golf courses with Pickering. Pickering’s ideal location on the shores of Lake Ontario facilitates marina, and a large waterfront trail, plus a lakeside park. Much of Pickering is still farmland, greenbelt or protected agricultural reserve and wild lands. Most of the western fringes of Pickering are part of the Rouge River park system; the largest urban park in North America. Pickering has a large indoor mall with over 200 stores and a large retail power center.

 Life in Pickering can be described as small city near a large city. Pickering is family oriented and can be described as being a quality middle-class community. Green areas and natural reserves all around the town add to the quality of life of its population. There is a wide range of housing choices, from several high-rise condominium buildings and small starter houses to million dollar estates located near the Rouge valley or within the rural hamlets.  Housing within Pickering is affordable, with starter townhouses available under $225,000 and four bedroom detached houses selling for about $375,000 or more. The City of Pickering is a preferred community of choice for residents and businesses and has been previously recognized by Canadian Living Magazine as, "the best place in Canada to raise a family."

Visit the website of Pickering!